Though we really did try to make it.
Bethany. 19. Tallahassee, FL.

abrotion:

gay marriage is only legal in 18 countries but being gay is a crime in 83 countries like i’d literally be breaking the law just by LIVING in 83 countries in the world but yeah go on tell me again how “homophobia isn’t even a big deal anymore” thanks

Live the life you’d be envious of if you saw someone else living it. This is my personal mantra. Whenever I’m going through a difficult time, like a breakup, and I’m wishing to be the person who could get over it and move on, I tell myself to be that person. Instead of waiting to be inspired by someone else and being jealous that they’re living a life I wish I had, I tell myself not to wait for that moment and to start being the person I want to be … Think, if I have the energy to wish for it, I have the energy to do it.Olivia Dunn (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

concernedresidentofbakerstreet:

spexote:

what if after you die you get stats like

words said total: 21,390,459

pushups done: 1.3

hours spent crying: 238

1.3 pushups

filmesss:

Moonrise Kingdom - 2012

reattachment:

If we’re texting then I have to be the one to reply late and not you
sorry I don’t make the rules


mightyflower:

to quote hamlet act III scene iii line 92, “no”

abeautifulnostalgia:

abeautifulnostalgia
Edwardian Actress
onceuponatown:

New York, 1898: Born to a Japanese mother and a German father, Sadakichi Hartmann began his career as a freelance art critic in the 1890s. Famous for his bohemian lifestyle, he became one of America’s few recognized authorities on Japanese culture following the publication of his book, Japanese Art, in 1904. In his 1910 book on artist James McNeill Whistler, he anticipated in many ways the modernist directions that contemporary painting would shortly take. Among Hartmann’s most significant contributions to art criticism were his writings on photography. Between 1896 and 1916, he penned more than 650 articles on the subject.
This 1898 photograph was created in New York City by Zaida Ben-Yusuf, a female photographer whose work Hartmann championed. About her, he wrote, “it is doubtful if there is in the entire United States a more interesting exponent of portrait photography than she is.”
Actually, I miss nothing from there, if missing means a sense of not being able to live without it. I’ve learned the dangers of that. After all, it was the missing of you that caused this whole flood to begin with.Sam Shepard, “The Devouring Lion” (via robcam-wfu)